Roseview blaze a trail in conservation areas

Friday, October 4, 2013 3:25:00 PM

Specialist uPVC vertical sliding sash window fabricator Roseview Windows is on a trail blazing mission. Roseview passionately believe high quality uPVC sash windows have a place in conservation areas and have spent the last few months campaigning to get their products specified by local councils. 

 

Following Roseview’s efforts their Heritage Rose and Ultimate Rose windows have been specified in over 30 conservation areas – and they’ve changed the opinions of many conservation officers in the process.

Roseview’s managing director Willie Kerr, who has spearheaded the campaign, comments: “There are still many conservation officers who see uPVC windows as tacky, poor quality and totally unsuitable for heritage properties. This may be true of the mock casements of yesteryear, that neither looked nor operated like a timber original, but technology has moved on. Our top spec product, the Ultimate Rose, has all the hallmarks of a 19th century box sash– and one conservation officer even said it looks more authentic than many modern timber windows!”  

Roseview manufacture two windows that have been specified in conservation areas – the Heritage Rose and newly launched Ultimate Rose. Both include a deep bottom rail, authentic putty lines and slim sight lines.

The difference between the two windows is subtle but important. The Ultimate Rose has full mechanical joints, comes with premium hardware and Roseview’s in-house developed run-through horn as standard. The Heritage Rose has welded joints – although these can be polished out to give an authentic look – and the run-through horn and top spec hardware is optional.

“The Heritage Rose has been specified in conservation areas for a number of years but we felt we could improve upon it, which is why we launched the Ultimate Rose, including full mechanical joints, our flush run-through horn and other premium features as standard” Willie explains. “The product is now ideal for heritage properties or instances when only the most authentic aesthetics will do.”

Backing up Willie’s claim is Geoff Bennett, conservation officer for Brighton and Hove City Council. He recently accepted the Ultimate Rose and had this to say about the product:

“Brighton and Hove City Council has rejected numerous uPVC windows because they would have looked out of place on the area’s historic buildings. When I first saw the Ultimate Rose I could not believe it was made from uPVC. The window looks incredibly authentic – it looks more like a timber original than even some modern timber products.” 

A strong endorsement indeed, and one that Roseview will no doubt show to the next conservation officer they meet during their campaign.

For more information on Roseview call on 0844 870 7178 or visit www.roseview.co.uk

Crafted by DMSQD